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Out with the old, in with the new…right…? Unfortunately when your early 1900’s dairy farm meets 2016 there are some things that just aren’t worth saving anymore. And that is where the fate of the “old garage” came in.

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We have the luxury/curse of having very old buildings on our property from when it was a working dairy farm. I absolutely adore them and love them unconditionally, however, my husband sees them as unusable hazards.  So the never ending battle of the buildings started with our little garage stuck in the side of the hill next to our driveway…

This little garage was just to my liking. It was built into the hill with a walk in loft with just enough old rotting, worn wood. It had these battered sliding doors on the front and more character and history than you can imagine! But…there was a problem. The top half of the garage had started to lean inward and looked as if it could collapse at any moment.

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My husband immediately suggested we tear it down. As I searched for contractors to fix it. I brought guy after guy after guy out to estimate fixing it and/or rebuilding it and I kept getting the same answer. “We could…but it’s going to cost you a ton of money, you’re better off building a new building.” Feeling deflated on the situation I at least felt like I gave it the good ole try it deserved. But the end sided with my husband. It had to go.

As the weeks went on, it got worse and worse. You could literally see the building slowly falling apart.  We hired a company to come and tear it down and fill in the hole. They ended up tearing the top part off and collapsing the rest of the garage in of its self and topping it off with dirt. Yup, they literally buried our building.

As much as I loved that falling down garage, it being gone had really opened up our view. Now from the kitchen you can see all the way to the garden, you can see the chicken coop from the road now I don’t have to worry about it falling on my chickens when they would sneak in there to get out of the sun in the summer time.

Here are some before and after pictures of my beloved garage.

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Before

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After

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Before, from the house

 

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After from the house

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Before from top of the hill

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After from the top of the hill

We have since then been able to get enough grass growing (after battling it out with the chickens over grass seed) and have built a new pole shed on the other side of our gravel driveway that leads to the other barns. You’ll see it in updated pictures on our blog from here on out.

Husbands note: This is actually one of the “newer” buildings on the property (circa 1940s) but the first to go. The dairy and horse barn are from (I beleive) the turn of the century and while in rough shape, their foundations of quarried stone are still strong. The garage was cinder block. It’s heartbreaking to see these structures go. However, it costs a fortune to maintain them. We could never afford the roofing cost and insuring them is not cheap either. There are no plans to raze them anytime soon and I’d like to invest in the horse barn as it has a wood shop in it, but the dairy barn will (at best) be used for reclaimed barn wood, if it doesn’t just stand as a relic of bygone era until it falls down. With the low ceilings, gutter, piping, etc it could not be re-purposed easily. I think I’ll do a post on it though, in the hopes its legacy can at least live on in the interwebs…

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